Looking for a personal trainer?

  • Struggle to exercise regularly even though you love the benefits?

  • Don’t know where to begin?

  • Do you need guidance in reaching a goal(s)?

  • Have you been instructed by your physician to begin an exercise program and don’t know how to begin?

  • Are you looking to overhaul your lifestyle and become healthier physically, mentally and emotionally?

With my coaching, guidance, instruction, and motivation you can be empowered to create the change you desire. Training sessions are offered in-home, mine or yours.

Nicole Miller

Phone: 719.660.9277

Email: nmiller69@comcast.net



What Your Recovery Heart Rate Can Tell You!

Image result for heart rate

What is your recovery heart rate?

It is the difference between your exercise heart rate and 1-minute of rest. Example: 180 (peak exercise heart rate) – 130 (heart rate after 1-minute of rest) = 50 bpm (beats per minute) difference

What can it tell me?

Your recovery heart rate is a way to determine your physical state. The recovery number (which is the difference between your exercise heart rate and 1-minute of rest) correlates to your cardio (aerobic) fitness level; the higher the number, the better. If the number is low (20 beats or less) it is a sign that you are over-training (incomplete recovery) or the body is compromised (illness, stress). In extreme cases, it can even suggest a heart condition*.

What do I do with this “recovery heart rate” information?

Apply it to your workouts! Take your recovery heart rate after your initial warm-up and prior to your workout.  Determine if it is at or better than 20 beats per minute (bpm). If at or better, continue with your workout, but, if it’s 19 bpm or less, your body might be telling you it’s overtrained or comprimised.  If that’s the case, consider an easier workout or perhaps a day off. Regularly monitor your recovery heart rate and notice trends.

How do I determine my recovery heart rate?

Use your pre-workout warm-up (make sure it’s high intensity physical movement that corresponds to your fitness level) to elevate your heart rate. At the very least, move vigorously for one full minute! Note your peak (A) heart rate—-highest heart rate obtained during a single workout session—-during this time. Quickly move into seated and relaxed position. Record your heart rate after relaxing for one full minute (B).

Subtract your 1-minute recovery heart rate (B) from your peak heart rate (A). The difference is your recovery heart rate (see above). Determine your physical state by using the guidelines below.

< 10 bpm difference = Extreme caution

11-20 bpm difference = Low

21-40 bpm difference = Good

41-50 bpm difference = Excellent

> 50 bpm difference = Fit athlete


Whats the best way to take my heart rate?

You can take you heart rate manually by counting pulses at your carotid artery (neck), radial artery (wrist) or your heart. For a better reading, count for the full 60-seconds and apply light pressure at the artery. You can also take advantage of today’s technology. Using a heart rate sensor such as the Apple Watch, Garmin or Heart Zones Blink, makes heart rate readings easy and accurate!

* A low recovery heart rate doesn’t mean you have a heart condition. You would have to monitor this over time and consider all factors. Please discuss any irregularities with your physician.







45-Minute Balance Trainer Workout!

45-minute Balance Trainer Workout

45-minute Balance Trainer Workout





5-minutes of movement every hour has its benefits!

For those individuals that are sedentary, even low-intensity movement interruptions––five minutes every hour––can improve metabolic conditions.

The American Council on Exercise along with a team of researchers in the High Altitude Exercise Physiology Program at Western State Colorado University investigated the optimal frequency, intensity and time for reducing sedentary behavior to improve cardiometabolic health in middle-age and older adults.

Through this study we learn that improvements in one’s HDL, triglycerides and blood glucose can occur by simply moving, at a minimal intensity level, for five minutes every hour. In fact, duration and frequency proved more important than an increase in movement intensity.

Of course, these study results do not mean that regular, structured exercise is unimportant in the quest for better health. Rather, the focus should be placed on both regular exercise and reduced sitting time.

View the study’s results here.

Exercise Induced Inflammation

Read more about exercise induced inflammation and how to reduce it from the Collegiate & Professional Sports Dietitians Association.


Why I love my Apple Watch!

I’ve been wanting a wearable for some time, but it wasn’t until I attended a lecture by Jay Blahnik, Director of Fitness and Health technologies for Apple Inc., while attending the IDEA World Fitness Convention that I decided to get an Apple Watch Series 3. As a personal trainer, I wanted an accurate device that counted steps, measured my heart rate, tracked my sleep, activity, and calorie burn. This device does it all, and more!

If you are considering a wearable, here are three articles that can provide you with details on the health and activity components of the Apple Watch:




Foam Rolling Exercise Handout

Here’s a great handout that you can use for your regular foam rolling!

What You Need to Know About Nutrient Timing

ACE Fitness Professional, Justin Robinson writes:

Your workout is complete and now the real race begins. As you wipe off the last bead of sweat from your forehead, you rush to the locker room to grab your shaker bottle. Your “anabolic window” is closing so you chug your protein mix before you even sit down to catch your breath.

Does this sound familiar? As trainers and athletes, we have been told for years that nutrient timing is crucial and that we are “wasting our workout” unless we ingest a post-workout shake immediately. The classic nutrient timing train of thought has been to consume carbohydrate before a workout and protein afterward. While this approach is logical, is it supported by current research?

Some may argue that we actually have it backwards, and that protein is more effective prior to a workout. Furthermore, timing is not crucial as long as we consume adequate calories and nutrients within a 24-hour period.

To help clear up some of the confusion, here’s what you need to know about nutrient timing.