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Looking for a personal trainer?

  • Struggle to exercise regularly even though you love the benefits?

  • Don’t know where to begin?

  • Do you need guidance in reaching a goal(s)?

  • Have you been instructed by your Doctor to begin an exercise program and don’t know how to start?

  • Are you looking to overhaul your lifestyle and become healthier physically, mentally and emotionally?

With my coaching, guidance, instruction, and motivation you can be empowered to create the change you desire. Training sessions are offered in-home, mine or yours.

Nicole Miller

Phone: 719.660.9277

Email: nmiller69@comcast.net

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5 Tips For A Successful Walking Program

Walking is one of many physical activities that can help you become fit and healthy–and stay that way. The activity is low impact, enables you to explore your surroundings, requires no equipment and offers numerous health benefits. Regular walking can also help manage your weight, and as an added bonus, your next medical check up may show physiological changes as well! Is walking an activity that you currently or could potentially enjoy? Here are five tips for a successful program:

Set a weekly mileage or step goal. Write down your weekly goal and plan for it. What time will you walk? Where will you walk? What distance will you cover? Your mileage or steps should be a planned activity, not part of your every day movement. With a moderate walking pace you should be able to complete 4 miles* in 60-65 minutes. Over the course of seven days, you could easily accumulate a minimum of 20 miles. If your are new to walking, start with 1-2 miles a week. Add a ½ mile per week until you reach your weekly goal. Work to complete the distance first, then you can work to increase your speed, if you so desire. If using a pedometer to record steps, work to accumulate 8,000 steps (steps to miles chart) a day.

Walk at a moderate intensity. Using a scale of perceived exertion from 1 to 5 (1 is very easy, 5 is very hard) your walking should be at a level 3 or 4. A steady music tempo can help maintain intensity. If you enjoy listening to music while you walk, use your own music playlist and set a steady tempo (general range is between 120-140bpm). You can do this by using the Tempo Pro Magic app. Yet another app, RockMyRun–yes, you can use it to walk–changes the tempo of the music you’re listening to in order to match your pace. Explore other apps that offer similar features.

Monitor your progress. How far did you walk today? What was your pace? How did you feel after your walk? Journaling, whether in a notebook or online, works well along with a pedometer. Those who are tech savvy can use an app, such as MapMyWalk. Within this app you can monitor your pace, record your distance and join in group challenges. Friends and family members (that use this app) can connect with you. It’s a great source for motivation, encouragement and friendly competition.

Eliminate barriers. No sidewalks where you live? Is there rain in the forecast? No excuses. Plan accordingly. Use the stairs at your office building or any other public walking area. Here are local options:

Mountain Ridge Middle School and Jenkins Middle School have tracks open to the public.

• Chapel Hills Mall’s route is 1.41 miles. A great indoor alternative!

Create a support system. Join a walking group or recruit a walking buddy (or two!). Discover local MeetUp groups in your area like this local walking club.

Are you local and looking for a walking buddy? Reply below with your contact information & let’s see if we can connect you with someone!

 

*As an alternative, 4 miles could be accumulated over a 24-hour period.

The importance of your TVA

Uh, what’s my TVA?

TVA stands for transverse abdominus, one of your deepest abdominal muscles.

Okay. What does it do?

Considered part of you core, this muscle (along with fascia) works as a corset to aid in spinal stabilization.

Why should I care about this muscle any more than the others?

A strong and functional TVA helps the other muscles in the body activate (think nervous system sending the information where it needs to go) and work efficiently (think force production sent to the muscular extremities instead of your bones and joints). It is your foundation for every movement. You can only be as strong and functional as your foundation.

I perform abdominal work all the time, I’m sure I engage it regularly.

Not so fast. Learning how to engage and cue in to your TVA takes practice. This 7-minute video from Beverly Hosford might help. I attended one of Beverly’s anatomy workshops this past summer at the IDEA Fitness Conference. Her video can help you 1) understand how the transverse abdominis works 2) locate the muscle in the body and 3) learn to engage it.

Alright, alright. I get it. What specific exercises can I add to my list?

First and foremost, you must be able to cue in to you TVA before the exercises are effective. The drawing-in maneuver or vacuum exercise (shown in this video) are excellent. Be aware of these techniques when you perform your traditional abdominal exercises to get more bang for your buck!

“Twelve in 12” Hiking Challenge

After the past few weeks of gloomy weather, it’s a joy to see the sun and know that summer is offically here. Why not enjoy Colorado’s scenic outdoors this season by hiking a few of our local trails! Do you think you could hike one trail per week? If so, you may have fun participating in the:

“Twelve in 12” Hiking Challenge

What does this challenge involve?

Simply hike each of the trails (found here: Twelvein12Challenge) within 12 weeks (Summer months – June 1 to August 31*)  while exploring different areas of the Pikes Peak region. Document your hike by taking a selfie on the trail. Post your photo to the Facebook group page titled “Twelve in 12” (more info below).

The trails are within the Pikes Peak region and range from easy to moderate in difficulty. The distance varies. Some trails offer more than one route – you choose!

How do I participate?

1) Tell me you are accepting the challenge by leaving a reply/comment in the box below. For example, “I, Nicole Miller, accept the Twelve in 12 challenge.”

2) Access Facebook.com and search for the private group “Twelve in 12“.  Ask to join this group; this is where you will post your photos.

What do I earn for participating?

Stronger legs, a more efficient cardiovascular system and bragging rights! Also, a chance to win a complimentary personal training session. For every trail you complete you earn one entry into the drawing.**

Any rules?

You may hike more than one trail in any given day or week. Hiking the same trail more than once doesn’t mean additional entries. If you hike trails not listed (encouraged) you will receive a pat on the back instead of additional entries. Remember this challenge is merely to provide you with a reason to move your body and a way to interact through social media.

Thanks to my client and friend, Karen Garbee, for sharing this idea and allowing me to put my spin on it.

Are you in or are you out?

*the date range actually covers 13 weeks, but I thought the “Twelve in 12” title had a better ring. **The drawing will take place the first week of September. Winner will be notified by email and on the group page. Winner has 6 months from that date to use complimentary session.

 

It’s all about the abs, ’bout the abs…

Over the years and throughout many health clubs, I’ve seen it all. Ab exercises that is. When it comes to exercises for your abdominals, you need to consider the mechanics of that region, muscle fiber recruitment and whether or not the risks of the movement outweigh the benefits. These are a few questions I’m asked regularly:

Is there a secret way to achieve a six-pack?
Can you work your upper and lower abs separately?
Can you work your abs everyday?
Can you lose body fat in your abdominal region by doing ab work?

These and other questions have been researched and answered by Dr. Len Kravitz, Ph.D. In order to give educated answers to questions regarding abdominal exercises, it’s his expertise that I rely on. Now, you too, can read through his resource manual and gain a better understanding of the abdominal region and exercises for it.

What caught your attention in Dr. Kravitz’s manual? Please share.